The Lost Art of Good Conversation: A Mindful Way to Connect with Others and Enrich Everyday Life

The Lost Art of Good Conversation: A Mindful Way to Connect with Others and Enrich Everyday Life

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The Lost Art of Good Conversation: A Mindful Way to Connect with Others and Enrich Everyday Life

This book is part of Mindful Speech. We put emphasis on mindful body, and mindful mind because we get direct experiences from our body when we aren’t present. With Mindful speech, we can easily dismiss how we hurt each other when we don’t fully listen. We also don’t see how toxic the environment can come when speech is riddled with gossip and untruths.

This is a simple but helpful book that reminds us of the power of speech and good communication with others. The Sakyong reminds us that through mindful speech we reconnect with estranged coworkers, friends, and relatives.

It takes an effort to be present and listen to another human being, but in doing so it elevates ourselves and others to the dignity and wisdom that is inherent in all of us.

This book makes a great gift -especially for those that talk first and listen last. 

From the San Francisco Zen Center:

Q: Does it really make a difference whether anyone individual practices right speech?

F.S.: Thích Nhất Hạnh taught at San Francisco Zen Center years ago, and he said something I’ve always remembered. When boats crowded with Vietnamese refugees ran into fierce storms or pirates, if everyone panicked then everyone was lost. But if even one person on the boat remained calm, that person showed the way for everyone to survive. It’s the same thing with speech. If you’re committed to the Buddhist path and your intention is to benefit all beings, then you’re going to make every effort to practice right speech. 

When you live in alignment with the precepts, that’s when you find freedom. It’s paradoxical to the instincts that are embedded in our human DNA toward self-love and self-preoccupation. But your joy will come from what you offer to others.